George Floyd Dies After Being Pinned Down By Minneapolis Police

The video in question shows a white police officer with a man, later identified as George Floyd, pinned to the ground next to the back tire of his patrol car with his knee on the back of the man’s neck. “Please, please, please I can’t breathe,” he begs. “My stomach hurts. My neck hurts. Please, please. I can’t breathe.”

Some people watching in the crowd told the officer to get off the man. “You’re stopping his breathing right now, you think that’s cool?” one man says. “His nose is bleeding, look at his nose!” says a woman but the officer did not stop. When the man stopped moving more people attempted to intervene, but the officer stayed on the man’s neck as the man laid there unresponsive. The officer had him pinned for about 8 minutes before the paramedics arrived.

Floyd died on Monday night and the four officers involved have been terminated Body camera video is available, but has not been made public yet.

“The man looked already dead before the ambulance even got there. He was clearly trying to tell them he couldn’t breathe and they ignored him,” Darnella Frazier said.

The officers were responding to a report of a forgery in progress. Once there, they found the suspect in his car. He stepped out of the car when he was ordered to but allegedly resisted.

Early Tuesday the Minneapolis Police Department released a statement. “Officers were able to get the suspect into handcuffs and noted he appeared to be suffering medical distress,” the statement said. “Officers called for an ambulance. He was transported to Hennepin County Medical Center by ambulance where he died a short time later.”

The department said that they called the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension to do an independent investigation but later announced that the FBI would also be investigating too.

After reviewing the video, Mayor Jacob Frey said “What we saw was horrible, completely and utterly messed up… I believe what I saw, and what I saw was wrong at every level.” He continued, “Being black in America should not be a death sentence… When you hear someone calling for help, you are supposed to help, and this officer failed in the most basic human sense.”

A protest is planned for Tuesday night at the site. Mayor Frey is encouraging protestors to express their anger safely and while social distancing.

Life Without Parole for $20 of Marijuana

In Louisiana, a homeless man named Fate Vincent Winslow helped sell $20 of weed and got life in prison with no chance for parole.

He was paid $5 to drop it off but did not know he was selling it to an undercover cop working on a prostitution operation in Shreveport. When asked why he agreed to deliver the weed, he said he wanted to use the money to buy food.

He was arrested in 2008 and is still behind bars. It wasn’t that single sale that got him with such a harsh sentence though. He had 3 prior felony convictions (none for violent crimes). 24 years earlier he was convicted for simple burglary, another simple burglary conviction 15 years before, and possession of cocaine in 2004.

Under Louisiana’s habitual offender law, prosecutors pushed for the maximum punishment. In the end, Fate Winslow was served a life sentence. When he appealed, judges did not believe he deserved leniency, “The defendant has failed to rebut the presumption by showing that he is exceptional,” they wrote in 2010. “The fact that his prior offenses were nonviolent is, by itself, insufficient.”

He would not have faced a life sentence were it not for the state’s three-strikes, law for repeat offenders. He remains behind bars and will die in the world’s prison capital for selling $20 worth of weed. Do you believe this justice?

Fate Vincent Winslow

The HOPE Foundation Shelter (Hampton Roads)

Founded by Regina Darden, The Hope Foundation operates from the Lighthouse Community Church. It is the only summer shelter available to the homeless in Hampton Roads. Hope stands for “Helping Others Pursue Excellence”.

Since she started four years ago, she has had over 200 volunteers and partners join her. They help provide funds and resources to get people back on their feet.

Darden said, “In our shelter, we turn no one away- nobody. How do we know who God is? God is dressed in anything. So we don’t turn anybody away at our shelter. If they get to that door, they can come in.”

Volunteer Diane Surida-Middleton revealed that Darden “does take 70 percent of her paycheck as a longshoreman to make sure people are fed.”

“After we feed their body and get them to get comfortable and get that off their mind, then we feed their soul because you can’t tell anybody about Jesus if they’re hungry,” said Darden.

She gives her guests a card with her contact information in case of an emergency. There were times when people have died with no identification but emergency officials were able to contact Regina.

Willie Johnson said, “I was on the street myself and it was raining one night and a man said ‘You can’t stay under this bridge but there’s a place over there off of Virginia Beach Boulevard. Let’s go check it out… I came many a Monday, Wednesday or Friday night that the shelter was open during the summer and I came in crying and she said ‘Baby, just let it flow.’”

“God created it,” said Darden, “I said ‘OK, God, what is it you want me to do?’ and He said ‘I want you to start a shelter.’

Darden won WAVY’s 2020 “Remarkable Women Contest”. If you would like to volunteer with HOPE Foundation or need help from them visit their website here.

Ahmaud Arbery Walmart Shoplifting Arrest Video

The police released their bodycam footage of Ahmaud Arbery from 2017. The video shows him being handcuffed and arrested:

The video was posted on YouTube on Tuesday and it is dated December 1, 2017. It shows Arbery and 3 other kids being approached by cops in a Walmart parking lot:

“Tell me about the TV,” a police officer asks.

“TV? What? We don’t have any TV,” Arbery, wearing shorts and a parka, responds.

“What about the 65-inch TV?” the cop says.

“Sixty-five-inch TV?” Arbery says.

“Do me a favor,” the cop replies. “All of you take a seat.”

“Take a seat for what?” Arbery snaps back. “I don’t know nothing about no TV. … I don’t steal no TV.”

Another man, presumably a Walmart employee, approaches and the police officer tells him, “it’s that one right there with the fur jacket” — suggesting Arbery — and the man nods.

“What TV?” Arbery says. “The TV is in there,” motioning toward the store.

Arbery then says he has a receipt and attempts to get up but is placed in handcuffs and put in a squad car.

They drive him to the store, where he and the three teenagers walk in the back of the store and in the back office. The outcome of the shoplifting arrest is not clear.